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Paralyzed hockey player shares health update in shocking video!

This will make your day!

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News can be so depressing that hearing the type of news we are bringing you here will make your day. Fox News, and many other outlets, have revealed that Jack Jablonski, the Benilde-St. Margaret’s hockey player who was paralyzed in a game back in 2011, has made major improvement in his health condition. 

Jablonski was a 16-year-old high school sophomore at Benilde St. Margaret’s in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, when he suffered a life-changing spinal cord injury after he was checked head-first into boards and broke his neck during a junior varsity hockey game in December 2011. Doctors informed Jablonski he was paralyzed from the chest down and would never walk again. 

The boy underwent intense physical therapy, but did not regain any movement in his lower body — until recently. On the Fourth of July, Jablonski celebrated in the best way possible, feeling his toes wiggling for the first time in seven years.  He posted the 20-second clip of his greatest accomplishment son far on Twitter Monday.

"Moving my toes on my own on my command," Jablonski tweeted, along with the video which has been viewed so many times now. Have a look for yourself: 

Jablonski, now 22, said the video was taken while he was on his family’s deck in Minneapolis on July 4th. He tries to move his toes periodically, he said. His left foot didn’t move, but then:

"I started with the left foot and had no luck. Then tried the right. As I was trying to curl my toes down the outside three toes would twitch and flicker as I would attempt to do it," Jablonski told Fox News.

He called the movement “surreal” and said it’s great to see his hard work paying off.

It is now believed that his spinal cord may not be "completely severed," as doctors initially said.

"It was another sign that that is not case," he added.

"With the progress we’re seeing in the medical and scientific world it gives me hope to keep working hard in physical therapy and keep trying to prove the doctors wrong," Jablonski said, adding that he's currently in a great place and seeing progress.

There is still a long road for Jablonski, however, this is a great sign that anything is possible. 

Keep up the great work, Jack!